Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

James F Woodward

California State University, USA

Keynote: Recent developments in advanced propulsion and the issues of interstellar transport

Time : 09:45-10:15

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker James F Woodward photo
Biography:

James F Woodward has completed a PhD in history (of science) at the University of Denver in 1972 after obtaining bachelors and master’s degrees in physics at Middlebury College and New York University in the 1960s. Retired in 2005, he is emeritus professor of history and adjunct professor of physics at California State University Fullerton where he continues to do experimental work on advanced propulsion and the enigmatic sciences (gravity manipulation). Noting that inertia in general relativity is a gravitational phenomenon where local objects are seemingly instantaneously coupled to distant matter in the universe, he has elaborated a way that transient phenomena can be used to perform said manipulation. This, and other material related to this talk, can be found in his recent book: Making Starships and Stargates: The Science of Interstellar Propulsion and Absurdly Benign Wormholes published by Springer Verlag in 2013. His work is supported by the exotic propulsion initiative of the Space Studies Institute.

Abstract:

Advanced propulsion is often taken to encompass all propulsion schemes more advanced than chemical rockets. Really advanced propulsion, however, is that enabling interstellar travel in short times, and that demands wormholes and/or warp bubbles. The stepping stone to such schemes is often figuring out how to accelerate a vessel without ejecting large amounts of propellant – so-called field propulsion. These schemes – wormholes, warp drives, and field propulsion – all involve gravity “manipulation”, whereas all other advanced propulsion schemes do not. In this talk I will recount some of the activities known to me of the collection of people working on gravity manipulation in the past several years. It is a tale of trial and error. But tangible results indicate that gravity manipulation may in fact be achievable, making propellant less realistic. Realistic interstellar transport demands more than propellant less propulsion, as Kip Thorne and several graduate students showed in their work on wormhole physics in 1988. Six years later, Miguel Alcubierre constructed the “warp drive” “metric” of general relativity that shows what is needed to zip around spacetime, seemingly at speeds faster than the speed of light. The requirement for both wormholes and warp drives is a Jupiter mass of negative rest mass (“exotic”) matter. Before Thorne did his work, a small collection of people worked on schemes to make lightspeed (and faster) travel possible. And after Thorne and Alcubierre, that collection of people has worked toward the goal of realizing the conditions dictated by general relativity for “hyperspeed” travel, be it through wormholes or encased in warp bubbles. We will look at whether such schemes are possible.

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ramesh K Agarwal photo
Biography:

Ramesh Agarwal received PhD from Stanford University in 1975 and post-doctoral training at NASA Ames Research Center in 1976. From 1976 to 1994, he was the Program Director and McDonnell Douglas Fellow at McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories in St. Louis. From 1994 to 2001, he was the Sam Bloomfield Distinguished Professor and Executive Director of National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University in Wichita, KS. He is currently the William Palm Professor of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author/co-author of nearly 250 archival papers and over 500 conference papers. He is on the editorial board of 20+ journals. He is a Fellow of eighteen societies including AIAA, ASME, ASEE, SAE, IEEE, APS, and AAAS among others. He is the recipient of many honors and awards.

Abstract:

Design of space vehicles pose many challenges due to their hypersonic speeds since they travel through many flow regimes due to changes in the density of the atmosphere with altitude. Some of the key characteristics associated with hypersonic flow are extremely high temperatures and heat transfer to the wall of the spacecraft. At these temperatures the assumption of thermal equilibrium is no longer valid and the effect of rotational non-equilibrium must be included in the modeling the diatomic gas flow. This paper employs the Navier-Stokes equations which are modified to include a rotational non-equilibrium relaxation model to analyze the heat transfer, drag, and shock standoff distance for hypersonic flow past an axisymmetric blunt body and a bicone for various levels of rarefaction including the rotational non-equilibrium effect. The customized flow solver, ZLOW, is used to calculate the numerical solutions for laminar viscous hypersonic flow past a blunt body and a bicone at Knudsen numbers Kn in slip flow regime with and without rotational non-equilibrium. The effects of rarefaction in slip flow regime are modeled by applying the Maxwell’s velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions on the surface. The effects of including the rotational non-equilibrium terms are discussed for both the continuum (Kn = 0) and slip flow regime (Kn ≤ 0.1). In addition, both the blunt body and bicone are optimized in hypersonic, rarefied flow with rotational non-equilibrium by using a multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) for reduction of both drag and heat transfer.

Keynote Forum

Timothy Sands

The Naval Postgraduate School , USA

Keynote: Improved hamiltonian adaptive control of rotational mechanics

Time : 11:05-11:35

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Timothy Sands photo
Biography:

Timothy Sands completed his PhD at the Naval Postgraduate School and Postdoctoral studies at Stanford University and Columbia University. He is Dean and Senior Military Professor at the Air Force Institute of Technology’s School of Strategic Force Studies. He has published research prolifically in archival journals, conference proceedings, a book chapter, in addition to keynote and invitational presentations and holds one patent in spacecraft attitude control.

Abstract:

Adaptive control techniques often adapt control commands based upon errors tracking trajectories and/or estimation errors. Direct adaptive control techniques typically directly adapt the control signal without translation of estimated parameters. Indirect adaptive control techniques indirectly adapt the control signal by translating the estimates of unknown system parameters to formulate a control signal. The adaptation rule is derived using a proof that demonstrates the elimination of tracking errors (the true objective) and demonstrates stability, which is complicated by the nonlinear closed loop system. This presentation will elaborate on such techniques applied to rotational mechanics with time-varying mass.

Keynote Forum

Fred Barez

San Jose State University, USA

Keynote: Future of mobility with autonomous and connected vehicles

Time : 11:35-12:05

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fred Barez photo
Biography:

Fred Barez is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at San Jose State University (SJSU). His research involves smart vehicles, advanced transportation, machine learning, cyber security, smart home and energy efficiency. He is also Director of the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology Laboratory where he is engaged in research related to advanced transportation including electric drive propulsion system, collision avoidance sensors and application, smart and driverless vehicles, vehicle mobile connectivity, vehicle cyber security, virtual driving, distracted driving, and autonomous vehicles through collaboration with industry. He teaches dynamic systems vibration and control, electronics packaging and design, hybrid and electric vehicle fundamentals, he has authored over 60 journal and conference publications, four book manuscripts and two book chapters. He has supervised 180 graduate student projects and theses. He is an active reviewer for several national and international publications related to energy, battery storage, energy efficiency and management, and smart sensors and devices. Prior to joining San Jose State University, he worked in Disk Drive Storage industry and was Co-Founder and Founder of two successful start-ups. He is a Member and Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), a Member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Abstract:

The promise of autonomous and connected vehicles is primarily to improve the safety of the passengers and the public on the road. It is estimated that over 40,000 individuals lose their lives due to vehicle accidents. Major automotive manufacturers have invested in the range of $1 billion each to prepare for the future of mobility. Autonomous and connected vehicle technologies are being developed at a rapid pace. Even several of the ride share companies have invested their own finances or have developed joint partnership with automotive manufacturer to get a head start. The main components of such vehicles are the vehicle its, the huge number of electric and electronic devises and sensors, and the application of artificial intelligence through various forms of embedded software. The technologies are being developed across the board to improve the electrical power systems, the automotive communication CANBUS and the sophisticated telematics required for the self-driving cars. The advances and changes in the future of mobility environment are being made possible, in particular, related to sensors such as LiDAR, camera, radar, and sonar to name a few, to the vast required high speed processors, memories and software. Human Machine Interaction (HMI) must be maintained at various levels of autonomy. In this presentation, a brief overview of the autonomous and connected vehicles and its various levels of related autonomy will be presented. Various types of sensors are currently being developed to improve the self-driving autonomy of transportation environment. Challenges and ever-increasing opportunities related to future of mobility and inclusion of such technologies as autonomous and connected will be presented.

Keynote Forum

Brendan J O Toole

University of Nevada Las Vegas, USA

Keynote: Experimental evaluation and computational simulation of structures subject to high velocity impact loading

Time : 12:05–12:35

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Brendan J O Toole photo
Biography:

Brendan O’Toole is Director of the Center for Materials and Structures, Professor, and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. He completed his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware. His research interests include experimental characterization of metallic and composite material properties under a variety of loading conditions and dynamic computational analysis of structures subject to impact and explosive loading.

 

Abstract:

A series of experimental studies were conducted to study the plastic deformation of metallic plates under hypervelocity impact using a two-stage light gas gun. In these experiments, cylindrical Lexan projectiles were fired at target plates with velocities in the range of 4.0-6.0 km/s. Target materials studied include steel alloys, forged titanium, and additive manufactured titanium. Experiments were designed to produce a front side impact crater and a permanent bulging deformation on the back surface of the target without inducing complete perforation of the plates. Free surface velocities from the back surface of target plates were measured using the newly developed multiplexed photonic doppler velocimetry (MPDV) system. Trends in deformation patterns and failure modes for different target plate materials will be presented. Under these impact conditions, very high pressure and temperature states cause the target materials to behave like a fluid. Equation of state and complex material models are needed in the simulation models. Two different modeling approaches have been used to simulate the experiments. A Lagrangian based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method was used within LS-Dyna. SPH is a meshless numerical technique where the bodies are represented by particles or interpolation points. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were also conducted using CTH, an Eulerian hydrodynamics code. Both techniques were able to simulate the large deformations that developed over 2-5 microseconds. Rear surface velocity profiles versus time were calculated at several points near the impact center. Model features and comparisons with experimental data will be presented.

Keynote Forum

Isaac Elishakoff

Florida Atlantic University, USA

Keynote: Uncertainty analysis in engineering: Past, present, and future

Time : 12:35–13:05

OMICS International Mech Aero 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Isaac Elishakoff photo
Biography:

Isaac Elishakoff has completed his PhD from Moscow Power Engineering State University. He is a distinguished Research Professor at the Florida Atlantic University, Author or Editor of 30 books. He has published more than 450 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Associate Editor of four journals and Member of Boards of 18 journals.

Abstract:

Uncertainty quantification is becoming a very extensive field of research in recent years. Great scientists or government officials in unison pinpoint of its importance. According to Albert Einstein as far as the propositions of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality. According to the former queen of the Netherlands Beatrix, if one thing today is certain, it is a feeling of uncertainty—a premonition that the future cannot be a simple extension of the present. Galileo advises us: Measure what can be measured, and make measurable what cannot be measured. We measure uncertainty via roughly speaking via three alternative approaches: theory of probability and random processes; fuzzy sets based approached and bounding approaches, based on worst possible response, in combination with making worst possible response as high as possible. The first two theories are associated with a given measure, like probability density or membership function. The latter approach is known in the literature by various names such as guaranteed approach, convex modeling of uncertainty or information-gap theory, interval analysis and so on. The worst case scenario is easiest to explain to the boss or to the laymen. Roman poet Ovid (43 BCE-18 CE) advises us that: I see and approve better things, but follow the worse. William Shakespeare propagates analogous idea that: Since the affairs of men rest still uncertain, let’s reason with the worst that may befall. Naturally worst case scenario may turn to be very conservative. Hence there is a necessity of minimizing the worst case response. The current lecture will deliver into two sub-parts of the uncertainty modeling. Specifically the first part discusses various approaches of stochastic linearization and demonstrates the advantages of the recently proposed non-classical methodologies. It turns out that energy based linearization technique produces superb results. Second part deals with data enclosing problem and bounding the uncertain data with proper rectangles, ellipsoids, or super-ellipsoids suggested independently by Gabriel lame and Piet Hein. We suggest utilizing such enclosing of the data that the maximum predicted response is minimal. The super-ellipsoidal modeling is showed as the superior to all other techniques. The example of composite plate with four-dimensional data enclosed in super-ellipsoid is considered in detail. General recommendations are made for uncertainty quantification in conjunction with available data.

  • Fluid Mechanics | Aerodynamics | Airship Design & Development | Flight Vehicle Navigation | Bio Engineering & Bio-Mechanics | Heat Transfer Systems | Applications of Aerospace Technology | Mechanical Engineering & Management
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Speaker

Chair

Fred Barez

San Jose State University, USA

Session Introduction

Shuh Jing Ying

University of South Florida, USA

Title: Discover lagrangian equation for fluid mechanics

Time : 13:45–14:05

Speaker
Biography:

Shuh Jing Ying did his graduation from Provincial Shao-Hing High School. Because of the World War II, I like to be in military service, so I entered Chinese Air Force Technology Institute, and graduated with rank of number 3 in the class of 50 students. I served 4 years in the Engine Overhaul Factory in Taiwan China as a Lieutenant, and then I entered National Cheng-Kung University, majored in mechanical engineering. I graduated with number 1 student in the class of 85 students. I came to this country in 1958 and completed M.Sc. at Brown University and Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1966.

I received Outstanding Faculty Award in 1975, Engineer of Year Award in 1985, elected as Fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1995, and published a text book ‘Advanced Dynamics’ in 1997.  I retired in the year of 2000 and earned a title of Emeritus Professor. Because I like to serve this country and this world, so I am still working with a part time job in the University of South Florida.

Abstract:

Lagrangian equation is a useful tool in dynamics. Many equations are developed with the use of Lagrangian equation. But it is not used in fluid mechanics. Now based on the momentum equation in fluid mechanics, I derived the Lagrangian equation so I proved that it can be used also in fluid mechanics. Detailed derivation will be presented in the conference.  To illustrate the use of the equation, some examples are given. Those examples given are especially in very familiar area, so people can immediately recognize that is working. Momentum equations for inviscid fluid in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates are chosen for the illustration.  Now the door is open, application of the equation can be very fruitful to scientists in fluid mechanics.

Speaker
Biography:

Mark N Callender earned a BS in Aerospace from Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), an MS in Aviation Systems from the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), and a PhD in Engineering Science, with emphases in Thermal and Fluid Mechanics, from UTSI. He worked as a flight test engineer for the US Army Technical Test Center (ATTC) conducting performance and systems flight testing of various Army aircraft. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Aerospace at MTSU where he coordinates the aerospace technology concentration and teaches aerodynamics and aircraft performance and provides research mentorship to undergraduate and graduate students. His research interests include low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, active and passive flow control, micro air vehicle (MAV) lift production, force balance design, propeller sound reduction, the philosophy of time, and Christian apologetics.

Abstract:

Manned aviation is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in order to provide for safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible aviation in the United States. One environmental issue regulated by the FAA is the noise created by aircraft. Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Title 14 Part 36 deals specifically with sound pressure levels (SPL) according to aircraft type when the aircraft are in close proximity to the ground. Minimizing aircraft noise helps to maintain positive relationships between the aviation community and the general public. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are a very rapidly growing segment of the aviation industry within the National Airspace System (NAS); however, there is currently no regulation for UAS SPL. The UAS are regulated, as of August 29, 2016 such that they are mandated to be in close proximity to the ground (no higher than 400 ft). As with manned aircraft, UAS produce high levels of SPL, much of which is due to the rotors. The combination of close proximity to the ground, high SPL, and increasing UAS density will most certainly result in a negative public reaction. In order to minimize the audible impact of UAS, the author sought to minimize the SPL of small UAS propellers/rotors via leading edge, upper surface, and trailing edge modifications. The results of one type of leading edge modification were previously presented. Continued modifications consisted of additional leading edge combs, an upper surface fabric coating, and a trailing edge fabric tufting. These modifications were inspired by the three characteristics found on the flight feathers of certain owls. The modifications were evaluated individually and as a composite.

Speaker
Biography:

Songgang Qiu has completed his PhD from University of Minnesota and continued postdoctoral studies for a year. He is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at West Virginia University. He has served as the Principal Investigator for more than three dozen research projects. His research focus is in thermal-fluids, energy efficiency, energy conversion and energy storage.

Abstract:

The main limitation in the widespread implementation of solar thermal power generation is the lack of energy storage to overcome transients in incoming solar insolation. Although the use of phase change materials for latent heat based thermal energy storage is an improvement over sensible heat storage systems, the materials used have low thermal conductivities that limit the heat transfer rate during charging and discharging. One method to enhance the heat transfer rate is to embed heat pipes into the PCM. Heat pipes are an efficient means of transferring energy at high rates under nearly isothermal conditions by utilizing the vast amount of energy released during condensation/evaporation. However, the complex multiphase heat transfer makes it difficult to accurately model their behavior. A novel numerical model was derived that is able of capturing the heat transfer in unconventional geometries that experience non-uniform condensation. This would extend the range of the model and aid in the design of complex heat pipe networks. In order to validate the model, a series of experiments were conducted that examined the effect of working fluid fill volume, input hear, and inclination angle had on the thermal performance of the heat pipe. Strong agreement between the numerally predicated operating temperature and the experimentally recorded value were obtained. This lends confidence that the applied numerical method is capable of capturing the fluid dynamics and multiphase heat transfer that occurs within a complex heat pipe network allowing it to be used for full scale system optimization.

 

Khaled Asfar

Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Title: Dual-rotor vertical axis wind turbine mounted on houses

Time : 14:45–15:05

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled Asfar is a Professor in Mechanical Engineering/JUST University. He is the Founder of Innovation Center and Technological Incubator at the University. He has been a visiting scholar at Aerospace Engineering/Texas A and M University (2007-2008) and a visiting Professor in Mechanical Engineering/Purdue University (2008-2010). He received his PhD degree from Virginia Tech in 1980. He was awarded several scientific honors and awards such as the Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship (1991-1992). He published numerous articles in several fields and holds five US patents and patent pending applications. He is an Associate Editor for Journal of Vibration and Control.

Abstract:

The idea here is to utilize the high velocity wind that develops when wind blows over the inclined roof of individual home (Venturi effect). A dual-rotor wind turbine is mounted on a vertical axis on the highest point in a house. This design consists of two rotors, each rotor has three blades 120o away from each other, there is a space between the two rotors, the blade geometry and the turbine design is shown in the figure below. A vertical axis wind turbine is also mounted on the same shaft such that their combined torque is used to generate electricity from a generator on the same axis below the dual-rotors. This design has been chosen after numerically experimenting with several designs of horizontal rotor blades. The blades have been designed using Creo elements/pro engineer program. The proposed wind turbine has been tested numerically using the CFD program; XFLOW. The horizontal tangential forces on the blades were calculated by a function viewer. First, the forces Fx and Fz were evaluated. Second, the resultant forces and torque exerted by the blades on the vertical shaft are calculated. Finally, the effect of introducing this dual-rotor turbine on the power generated by the upper vertical wind turbine is investigated.

Jiawei Zhang

Beijing Institute of Technology, China

Title: Flow mechanism analysis of the Magnus effect for spinning finned projectile

Time : 15:05–15:25

Speaker
Biography:

Jiawei Zhang is studying for a Doctor's degree in Beijing Institute of Technology. His main areas of research is the aerodynamic characteristics of spinning projectile.

 

Abstract:

The study of the side force and the yawing moment of the spinning finned projectile usually focuses on the time-averaged value, because the engineer demands the time-averaged value to design the trajectory and analyze the stability of the projectile. However, for the flow mechanism study of the side force and the yawing moment, the analysis of the transient flow field is necessary. The previous studies always treat the transient aerodynamic coefficient directly. In this paper, the transient aerodynamic coefficient is divided into two parts. The static coefficient is decided by the roll angle ψ and the unsteady coefficient related to the spin rate . This paper presents the numerical simulation of a spinning projectile with four fins at angles of attack 15° and 25° with several spin rates. According to the research, dividing the transient aerodynamic coefficient into the static coefficient and the unsteady coefficient contributes to the Magnus mechanism study. The results showed that the unsteady coefficient have linear correlation with the spin rate in the present conditions. Besides a few cases at small Mach number and large angle of attack, the transient aerodynamic coefficient makes positive contribution to the time-averaged side force and moment. Furthermore, in supersonic conditions, the shock wave caused by the fins significantly influences the side force and moment, in other words, the shape of fin obviously affects the side force and yaw moment. At high Mach number, the leeward flow induced by the fore-body dominates the Magnus effect.

Jintao Yin

Beijing Institute of Technology, China

Title: Effect of elastic deformation on the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning projectile

Time : 15:25–15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Jintao Yin is now a PhD candidate from Beijing Institute of Technology. He is major in the aerodynamic characteristics of spinning vehicles, especially for those with structural deformation. He has published two papers in Aerospace Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Elastic deformation can occur on spinning projectiles that are flying under aerodynamic loads at high speeds. The coupling of elastic deformation with a rolling movement may affect the stability and maneuverability of the projectile. A comparison between the numerical results and the wind tunnel experiments for a rigid secant-ogive-cylinder (SOC) spinning projectile proves that boundary layer flow and aerodynamic characteristics can be accurately estimated using the shear stress transport (SST)  turbulence model. The equation describing the spinning and elastic movement was established. The projectile longitudinal deformation was defined as the low order bending mode of a free-free beam, and the deformation in crossflow plane was asumed as a heart-shaped curve. The spin and deformation movement were achieved by the sliding mesh method and the dynamic mesh with diffusion-based smoothing algorithm, respectively. Grid resolution and time independence studies were carried out for the accuracy of the unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results with both spin and elastic deformation. The numerical calculations indicate that the flow response lags behind the elastic deformation, and a difference is observed between the influence of upward and downward movements on the flow field, the boundary layer changes with elastic movement, resulting in a non-linear relationship between the movement and the induced aerodynamic forces. The induced time-averaged aerodynamic force increases with the elastic deformation rate, which in turn alters the direction of the time-averaged Magnus force.

Antonio O Dourado

Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil

Title: One versus two: A different philosophy in simulated combat training

Time : 15:45–16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Antonio O Dourado is a Professor of Flight Dynamics in the Aerospace Engineering Course at Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil and Editor of the Journal Applied Physics Research. He obtained his doctorate in Mechanical Engineering studying military dynamic flight simulators in 2012. Also, he has designed several motion simulators for aeronautic and automotive applications.

Abstract:

Pilots in military aviation are subjected to extreme conditions, like high-g maneuvers and flight in high angle of attack. In this sense, pilots must have good physiologic resistance besides proficiency in aircraft systems and weapons. Some suggest that with next generation aircraft with stealth features, beyond visual range combat will rule the skies. That can be true, but considering the designs of both Russian T-50 and Chinese J-20 and J-31 that give importance to maneuverability and stealth, it is not difficult to imagine an air combat starting in bvr but finishing in a dogfight. With this possible situation in mind, within visual range combat can’t be neglected, and pilots must train hundreds of hours per year to achieve the desired proficiency in ACM. To present day, flight simulation in combat training has a separated approach regarding physiologic and tactical training: Use of g-seats coupled with large field of view image projection for tactical training and centrifuges for physiologic training. The drawbacks are clear: g-seat can’t simulate extreme g-loads that undermine pilots stamina and current generation centrifuges (active or passive) can’t be properly used for combat training due limitations described in literature (i.e. motion sickness due Coriolis effect). If one could combine in a simulator, strengths of both systems in one new flight simulator, there’ll be a revolution in combat training. This paper proposes a change in paradigm in combat training, showing a new concept of flight simulator, considering that close combat will be still relevant in the near future.

Maurizio Manzo

University of North Texas, USA

Title: Optical sensing based on micro-scale resonators

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Maurizio Manzo is a new Assistant Professor joining the Department of Engineering Technology at the University of North Texas-UNT in fall 2017 and the Founder and Director of its Photonics Micro-Devices Fabrication Laboratory. He previously covered the position of Lecturer at Texas A&M University-Kingsville where he taught courses such as heat transfer, continuum mechanics, finite element methods, and control systems. He received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Southern Methodist University, Texas in 2015 and both MS and BS in Aerospace Engineering from Universita’ degli Studi di Palermo, Italy in 2011 and 2009 respectively. His research focuses on sensors development, instrumentation and flow diagnostics, and biomedical micro-devices. He has published papers in reputed journals and is a Member of ASME.

Abstract:

The whispering gallery mode phenomenon has attracted many scientists since was discovered by Lord Rayleigh in the 20th century in the San Paul cathedral in London. The high-quality factor together with the micro-scale dimensions of the resonator is fundamental for sensor’s applications. The light trapped inside a micro-resonator travels through total internal reflection generating the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) or morphology dependent resonances (MDRs). The optical modes are highly sensitive to the morphology of the resonator and any external event that induces a change in size, shape, and index of refraction of the micro-resonator leads to a shift in its optical modes. Therefore, the induced WGMs shifts can be related to the applied external event. In most applications, the coupling between the light and the micro-resonator is made using a single mode optical fiber connected to one end to a tunable diode laser and connected to the other end to a photodiode; on the other hand, wireless coupling is used in measurements where cabling tends to be problematic; in this case, a dye doped micro-resonator which acts as a tiny laser is used.

Andrew D Lowery

Terra Response, LLC, USA

Title: Terra response: A subsurface anomaly detection system

Time : 16:50-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Andrew D. Lowery has received degrees of Ph.D. (2012), M.S. in Mechanical Engineering (2006) B.S. in Computer and Electrical Engineering (2004) from West Virginia University. His research in the areas of design and controls, electromagnetics, and engineering education, resulted in peer reviewed publications, including 19 conference proceedings and 10 articles and bound papers. Dr. Lowery is a member of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, and Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society.

Abstract:

The need for object detection and recognition stems from the demands of many varying, worldwide applications including humanitarian, industrial, defense, and recreational needs. To date, the primary subsurface and anomaly detection techniques include ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic testing, ferrous material detection, and chemical detection. Each application arises from shared or distinctive interests within a specific field, and each method offers unique advantages and disadvantages. The industrial sector has become a source of incredible demand for subsurface object detection and recognition. As utility companies increasingly locate cable and pipe beneath the ground and within structures while transitioning to nearly exclusive use of plastics for those components, they have simultaneously generated a growing demand for detection of plastics within various mediums, particularly earth and concrete. The need for non-destructive testing has also grown within this sector.

 

The following paper will introduce a technology and describe its operation purely on detecting the electromagnetic signals generated from within the Earth itself. By being able to measure and monitor these signals generated from the core, such a system will not only be able to identify the shape and orientation of an underground object, but also, based on the changes in the measured signal, can predict the material composition of the object. This will demonstrate that such a system is the first of its kind to offer anomaly object detection and recognition in a completely passive manner with the added ability to locate a host of materials, including plastics.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmet Feyzioglu has completed his PhD in 2012 from Marmara University and Postdoctoral studies from University of Manchester, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research. He has been working in Marmara University Mechanical Engineering Dept. since 2013.

Abstract:

Nowadays, aerospace and aviation sector is a symbol of development level of a country. Most of the developing countries are growing with its investment on aerospace and aviation sector. This development creates needs for enterprises in the sector such as purchasing material, system, purchasing service (maintenance, repair, consulting, supporting), creating resource, acquisition planning from domestic market and adapt international enterprises requirements and systems. For connecting all these needs (EASA, FAA) to European market, it is important to have expert certification engineers and a programmer according to sector needs. Enterprises have to raise their competitiveness and sustainability in order to survive in the sector. This circumstance forces them to work on innovative studies and find innovative solutions. When companies gain more innovative structure, innovative solutions will take place in organizational dimension. Organizational innovative culture occurs in company with strong management support and that support is given by innovative leaders. In this research, aviation innovation management as well as a case study on aircraft certification will be pointed up. EASA standards will be featured in order to support mechanical engineering solutions.